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Mango

Mango

Product Description

Mangos (Mangifera indica) are oblong or kidney-shaped fruits with a smooth, leathery skin that varies in color from pink, red, yellow, green, orange or any combination thereof.
The juicy flesh of the mango is of slightly more fibrous than peaches or apricots, but of a deep yellow or orange color and should be free of fibres. Mangos are pleasantly aromatic with a rich balance of sugars and acids.
The fruit varies in size from 5 to 20 cm in length and 250 to 700 g in weight

History

Mangos originated in East India, Burma and the Andaman Islands bordering the Bay of Bengal. Around the 5th century B.C., Buddhist monks are believed to have introduced the mango to Malaysia and eastern Asia - legend has it that Buddha found tranquility and repose in a mango grove. Persian traders took the mango into the middle east and Africa, from there the Portuguese brought it to Brazil and the West Indies. Mango cultivars arrived in Florida in the 1830's and in California in the 1880's

Nutrition Information

Mangos are an excellent source of Vitamins A and C as well as a good source of folic acid, calcium and vitamin E as compared to other fruits. Mangos contain an enzyme which acts as a digestive aid and contributes to a feeling of contentment. Mangos, like papayas, kiwis and pineapples, contain enzymes that are good for marinating and tenderizing meat. However, since these enzymes break down proteinrich products they have a tendency to liquify dairy products and prevent gelatine from setting. If used for these purposes, mangos should be cooked for a short time. Every part of the mango is beneficial and has been utilized in folk remedies in some form or another. Whether the bark, leaves, skin or pit; all have been concocted into various types of treatments or preventatives down through the centuries

Serving size: 100 grams
Calories: 65
Protein: 0.51 grams
Fat: 0.27 grams
Carbohydrate: 17.00 grams

Use Tips

Mangos are ready to eat when they are slightly soft to the touch at the stem end and yield to gentle pressure, like a ripe peach. Avoid mangos with black spots! Sour taste, fibrous flesh or wrinkled skin are indications of mangos which were harvested too early. Over-ripe mangos often have a soapy, turpentine-like taste. Mangos will last up to two weeks in the refrigerator. They can easily be ripened at room temperature in a paper or plastic bag, together with an apple or a banana. Once ripe, mangos may be refrigerated for a few days. Avoid storing mangos at temperatures below 10° C

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Joe and Luis

Joe and Luis
Ecuador

Planeta Verde

Planeta Verde
Mexico

Justrop

Justrop
India

Fazenda Tamanduá

Fazenda Tamanduá
Brazil

Sunshine Farms, Peru

Sunshine Farms, Peru
Peru

ProNatur

ProNatur
Peru

Fruiteq

Fruiteq
Burkina Faso